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Master Bathroom The Master Bathroom in 1952, looking northeast (Truman Library - Abbie Rowe) The Master Bath The Taft bath tub before installation, circa 1911 The Master Bath is a large full bathroom with separate tub and shower stall. Under Franklin Pierce, running hot baths and showers came to the family floor, likely with a wood-stalled commode and porcelain sink. It had faux wood wallpapering and faux tile cloth flooring. By Lincoln's time, running water for washing came in from the Potomac River. Only two bathrooms served the pre-1900 family quarters. One was for the presidential bedchamber; the other, a "family bathroom" for everyone else, including guests, had three doors in addition to having partitions only head-high, making compartments for lavatories, toilets and bathtubs. With the 1902 renovation, modern bathrooms with silver faucets and handles and white porcelain were created in the four corner suites and tucked in elsewhere. President Taft, nicknamed "Big Bill," was over 330 pounds (150 kg) and sometimes had difficulty getting out of his bathtub in the White House. He had a huge, 7-foot (2.1 m) long, 41-inch (1.04 m) wide tub installed that could accommodate four normal-sized men. It was replaced in the 1952 rebuilding with a tub of similar size but more modern design. More Images The Master Bathroom in 1952, looking southeast (Truman Library - Abbie Rowe)


The Master Bath The Taft bath tub before installation, circa 1911 The Master Bath is a large full bathroom with separate tub and shower stall. Under Franklin Pierce, running hot baths and showers came to the family floor, likely with a wood-stalled commode and porcelain sink. It had faux wood wallpapering and faux tile cloth flooring. By Lincoln's time, running water for washing came in from the Potomac River. Only two bathrooms served the pre-1900 family quarters. One was for the presidential bedchamber; the other, a "family bathroom" for everyone else, including guests, had three doors in addition to having partitions only head-high, making compartments for lavatories, toilets and bathtubs. With the 1902 renovation, modern bathrooms with silver faucets and handles and white porcelain were created in the four corner suites and tucked in elsewhere. President Taft, nicknamed "Big Bill," was over 330 pounds (150 kg) and sometimes had difficulty getting out of his bathtub in the White House. He had a huge, 7-foot (2.1 m) long, 41-inch (1.04 m) wide tub installed that could accommodate four normal-sized men. It was replaced in the 1952 rebuilding with a tub of similar size but more modern design. More Images The Master Bathroom in 1952, looking southeast (Truman Library - Abbie Rowe)


Our first president, George Washington, selected the site for the White House in 1791. The cornerstone was laid in 1792 and a competition design submitted by Irish-born architect James Hoban was chosen. After eight years of construction, President John Adams and his wife, Abigail, moved into the unfinished house in 1800. During the War of 1812, the British set fire to the President’s House in 1814. James Hoban was appointed to rebuild the house, and President James Monroe moved into the building in 1817. During Monroe’s administration, the South Portico was constructed in 1824, and Andrew Jackson oversaw the addition of the North Portico in 1829. During the late 19th century, various proposals were made to significantly expand the President’s House or to build an entirely new house for the president, but these plans were never realized.


Funny you should ask. I both worked at the White House, and have a terrible colon condition, so I can safely say that I have used a very wide variety of bathrooms at the White House – perhaps more extensively than anyone in modern memory.


Only two bathrooms served the pre-1900 family quarters. One was for the presidential bedchamber; the other, a "family bathroom" for everyone else, including guests, had three doors in addition to having partitions only head-high, making compartments for lavatories, toilets and bathtubs. With the 1902 renovation, modern bathrooms with silver faucets and handles and white porcelain were created in the four corner suites and tucked in elsewhere.


Every president since John Adams has occupied the White House, and the history of this building extends far beyond the construction of its walls. From the Ground Floor Corridor rooms, transformed from their early use as service areas, to the State Floor rooms, where countless leaders and dignitaries have been entertained, the White House is both the home of the President of the United States his family and a museum of American history. The White House is a place where history continues to unfold.


Less than fifty years after the Roosevelt renovation, the White House was showing signs of serious structural weakness. President Harry S. Truman began a renovation of the building in which everything but the outer walls were dismantled. The reconstruction was overseen by architect Lorenzo Winslow, and the Truman family moved back into the White House in 1952.


President Taft, nicknamed "Big Bill," was over 330 pounds (150 kg) and sometimes had difficulty getting out of his bathtub in the White House. He had a huge, 7-foot (2.1 m) long, 41-inch (1.04 m) wide tub installed that could accommodate four normal-sized men. It was replaced in the 1952 rebuilding with a tub of similar size but more modern design.


White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said Wednesday during his daily briefing that the administration's action would be in accordance with Trump's states' rights stance. On this issue, Spicer said, "he is a firm believer in states' rights and that certain issues like this are not best dealt with on the federal level."


Protests erupted outside the White House and transgender rights groups reacted swiftly with statements of outrage. Mara Keisling, executive director of the National Center for Transgender Equality, said the reversal "sends a harmful message to transgender young people —that their government does not support them, and that it is fine to single out those who are different."


The newly designated restroom is an example of how the administration has been advancing the discussion by raising the profile of transgender issues, an area of debate that is especially hotly contested right now. The restroom will be located in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building, where much of the White House staff works.