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Hardest Wood Flooring

Hardest Wood Flooring

Blogs and Guides Why the Hardness Rating of Your Wood Floors Matters May 30, 2013March 9, 2017 Jamie 5 Comments hardest wood, janka hardness test, species of wood As we explained in a previous Home Flooring Pros guide there are plenty of good reasons to choose solid hardwood flooring ahead of other flooring options. Once you’ve decided that solid hardwood is the right choice for your home you will then begin the journey of choosing the species of hardwood, the wood grade, the size of plank, the finish and of course, unless you’re going to do the work yourself, the installer. In this flooring guide we are going to look at the relative hardness of different species of wood, the hardest wood flooring and why wood hardness might influence the type of wood you choose for your floor. Is the hardness of my wood floor important? – Laying solid hardwood throughout your home will be a significant investment in time and money compare with say carpet flooring. The most important consideration is that you choose a wood type that you love and gives you pleasure. That said you should at least be aware of how the hardness of the wood you choose might affect your continued enjoyment of your floors at a later date. Pros and Cons of a Soft Hardwood – Are you desperate to install Black Walnut or American Cherry wood in your home? If you are that’s fine but you should also be aware that both these woods are relatively soft and as such will be much more prone to dents and dinks from heavy furniture or careless treatment. Pros and Cons of a Hard Hardwood – Perhaps you’ve set your heart on an exotic hardwood like Brazilian Walnut or Ipe. These two examples are amongst the hardest hardwoods and are much less prone to dents but are also a lot less flexible. In a really dry climate installing the hardest wood could result in planks splitting because they have far less give in them than a softer wood like Oak. How can I tell the hardness of a wood species? – The Janka Hardness Test measures the force required to embed half of a .444 inch steel ball into a piece of wood. Take a look at this Janka Hardness Chart to get an idea of the relative hardness of some different species. It is perhaps unsurprising to see that White and Red Oak, two of the most popular species used in home flooring today, sit quite close to the middle of the range when it comes to hardness. Brazilian Ebony is listed as the hardest wood and not one you’re likely to find down at your local Home Depot! It is worth noting that the Janka Hardness test should only be used as a general guide to wood hardness. Results may be affected by the actual harvest location, the construction of the plank and, of course the finish. Remember it is the finish of the floor that you are actually walking on and it is the first line of defense against wear and tear. Also bear in mind that no wood, no matter how hard, is indestructible! Even the hardest exotic hardwood can dent. Finally, understand that the Janka test and all references to wood hardness in this guide are related to solid hardwood flooring rather than engineered hardwood flooring. So to sum up, Home Flooring Pros recommends that you choose the solid wood that you want to live with rather than the hardest wood, but bear in mind that the hardness of different wood species vary. If you’re not sure whether a particular hardwood is a good choice for your particular climate and needs then ask the advice of a local installer or take a look at our hardwood flooring guide. More Information on the Hardness of Different Hardwood Flooring YouTube – A video demonstration of the Janka Hardness test in action County Floors – An Online wood floor store with a helpful hardness chart and lots of info on different wood species. Have you had any first-hand experience of choosing a softer species of wood over a harder one? What’s the hardest hardwood flooring you’ve used? Do you have a preference and why? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below or contact us directly. Related Content You Might Like How to Prevent Hardwood Floors from Feeling Cold Best Floors for High Traffic Areas White Wood Floors and Other White Flooring Options & Ideas Acacia Wood Flooring: Pros & Cons, Reviews and Pricing
hardest wood flooring 1

Hardest Wood Flooring

As we explained in a previous Home Flooring Pros guide there are plenty of good reasons to choose solid hardwood flooring ahead of other flooring options. Once you’ve decided that solid hardwood is the right choice for your home you will then begin the journey of choosing the species of hardwood, the wood grade, the size of plank, the finish and of course, unless you’re going to do the work yourself, the installer. In this flooring guide we are going to look at the relative hardness of different species of wood, the hardest wood flooring and why wood hardness might influence the type of wood you choose for your floor. Is the hardness of my wood floor important? – Laying solid hardwood throughout your home will be a significant investment in time and money compare with say carpet flooring. The most important consideration is that you choose a wood type that you love and gives you pleasure. That said you should at least be aware of how the hardness of the wood you choose might affect your continued enjoyment of your floors at a later date. Pros and Cons of a Soft Hardwood – Are you desperate to install Black Walnut or American Cherry wood in your home? If you are that’s fine but you should also be aware that both these woods are relatively soft and as such will be much more prone to dents and dinks from heavy furniture or careless treatment. Pros and Cons of a Hard Hardwood – Perhaps you’ve set your heart on an exotic hardwood like Brazilian Walnut or Ipe. These two examples are amongst the hardest hardwoods and are much less prone to dents but are also a lot less flexible. In a really dry climate installing the hardest wood could result in planks splitting because they have far less give in them than a softer wood like Oak. How can I tell the hardness of a wood species? – The Janka Hardness Test measures the force required to embed half of a .444 inch steel ball into a piece of wood. Take a look at this Janka Hardness Chart to get an idea of the relative hardness of some different species. It is perhaps unsurprising to see that White and Red Oak, two of the most popular species used in home flooring today, sit quite close to the middle of the range when it comes to hardness. Brazilian Ebony is listed as the hardest wood and not one you’re likely to find down at your local Home Depot! It is worth noting that the Janka Hardness test should only be used as a general guide to wood hardness. Results may be affected by the actual harvest location, the construction of the plank and, of course the finish. Remember it is the finish of the floor that you are actually walking on and it is the first line of defense against wear and tear. Also bear in mind that no wood, no matter how hard, is indestructible! Even the hardest exotic hardwood can dent. Finally, understand that the Janka test and all references to wood hardness in this guide are related to solid hardwood flooring rather than engineered hardwood flooring. So to sum up, Home Flooring Pros recommends that you choose the solid wood that you want to live with rather than the hardest wood, but bear in mind that the hardness of different wood species vary. If you’re not sure whether a particular hardwood is a good choice for your particular climate and needs then ask the advice of a local installer or take a look at our hardwood flooring guide. More Information on the Hardness of Different Hardwood Flooring YouTube – A video demonstration of the Janka Hardness test in action County Floors – An Online wood floor store with a helpful hardness chart and lots of info on different wood species. Have you had any first-hand experience of choosing a softer species of wood over a harder one? What’s the hardest hardwood flooring you’ve used? Do you have a preference and why? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below or contact us directly. Related Content You Might Like How to Prevent Hardwood Floors from Feeling Cold Best Floors for High Traffic Areas White Wood Floors and Other White Flooring Options & Ideas Acacia Wood Flooring: Pros & Cons, Reviews and Pricing
hardest wood flooring 2

Hardest Wood Flooring

American Cherry Wood Flooring is a softer wood species than some of the others but you would find it hard to find another wood species that has such wonderful graceful graining and color. This wood species has a very distinctive charm and is popular because of its natural color variation from board to board and its warm natural color. Because of the unique graining and coloring of American Cherry flooring, many homeowners like to use it in wider planks. Planks 5″ and wider will show the natural beauty of American Cherry, but won’t look too busy, like it might in a 2-1/4″ strip. American Cherry flooring will darken with age to a deep reddish brown color. Take a look at either Bruce wood flooring or Harris Wood for great American Cherry Natural possibilities. Homeowners who like American Cherry also have a tendency to look at Natural Hickory flooring because of similar interesting grain patterns.

Hardest Wood Flooring

Hardest Wood Flooring
Hardest Wood Flooring

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